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This page was first created on the 11th of March, 2016 and last updated on the 11th of March, 2016 by Patrick Carpen.

Have fun learning the English language and English literature with Patrick Carpen.

The English Language – An Introduction

The English language is a beautiful language and the most popular in the world. It is also the official language of business internationally. The English language is also a very powerful one, with words to express just about any idea imaginable – all you have to do is build up a really strong vocabulary.

English grammar deals with the basic structure of the English language – what it is made up of and the rules you should follow when using the language.

Topics Covered…

The Parts of Speech – An Introduction

Everything that comes out of our mouths when we talk to each other is called “speech”. We “speak” and therefore produce something called “speech”. Read More…

The Parts of Speech – Definition and Examples

Noun: A noun is the name of a person, place, thing, idea, etc. Examples: dog, sea, New York, John, power, wisdom.

Verb: Verbs are action words. Examples: run, jump, talk, sit, sleep, drive, ride.

Adjective: Adjective are words which modify nouns. To modify in this case means “to change the meaning slightly” or “to add more meaning to”. The words in red below are adjective and the words in green are nouns which are modified by the adjectives. Examples: red ball, green grass, wet floor, tall man, short lady, big house. Read More…

The Abstract Noun

A noun is a word in the English language that names things, for example: tree, car and house. These are examples of things which we can see, feel, and touch. For example, you can sit in your car, hold the steering wheel and rub the top of it with your hands. If you loose control of your bicycle while riding, you could hit a tree at the side of the road…and a person could break an old house down and build a new one. All words in the English language that names physical things are called concrete nouns. Read More…

Transitive And Intransitive Verbs

Sometimes, when you’re looking up a word in the English dictionary, you may see the following abbreviation next to it:v-t OR v-i (or something similar).

V stands for verb. T stands for transitive. I stands for intransitive. The v signifies that the word is a verb, and that’s easy to understand. But what does transitive and intransitivemean? Look at the sentence below.

The boy threw the ball over the fence. Read More…

Regular And Irregular Verbs

Look at the sentences below:

I walk to school in the morning. (Present)
I walked to school yesterday. (Past)

The boy phones his friend every night. (Present)
The boy phoned his friend last night. (Past)

The man kills snakes any time he sees them. (Present)
The man killed the snake last year. (Past)

Brenda jumps over the fence now. (Present)
Brenda jumped over the fence one hour ago. (Past) Read More…

Passive And Active Voice

Have you ever been told to write a paragraph “in the passive voice”? What exactly is passive voice? It is the opposite ofactive voice. But what is active voice? It’s simple. Let’s take a look.

The terms “passive voice” and “active voice” describes verbs as they are used in sentences. A verb is said to be in theactive voice when the subject of a sentence performs an action. Look at the these sentences below. The words in red are the subjects of the sentences. The words in green are the verbs. Read More…

A Versus An – Correct Usage

Look at the sentences below:

Mary bought a book.
John ate an apple.

Both words in bold above mean “one” but what is the difference between the two? Do you ever wonder why sometimes a is used and other times an is used? Read More…

Kinds of Sentences

A sentence is a group of words which express a complete thought. In English, there are four kinds of sentences. The four kinds of sentences are: Read More…

The Subject And Predicate of a Sentence

A sentence in the English language is defined as “a group of words that express a complete thought”. In other words, when a sentence is spoken, the listener can understand something without the need for staring into the skies. Examples include:

The airplane has just landed.
We are going to America.
The flight leaves tonight.
Tomorrow is Friday. Read More…

The Simple Subject

We know that a sentence is made up of two main parts: a subject and a predicate. Look at the sentence below:

1. The restless child ran all over the yard.

Obviously, we are talking about “the restless child”. So all the words in red above together make up the subject of the sentence. What did we say about the restless child? We said that the restless child “ran all over the yard”. So then, “ran all over the yard” is the predicate of the sentence. Read More…

The Simple Predicate

We know that a sentence is made up of two main parts: a subject and a predicate. The subject is what we are talking about, and the predicate is what we say about the subject. Look at the sentence below: Read More…

Sentences With Compound Subjects

We know that a sentence is a group of words that express a complete thought. We also know that a sentence is divided into two main parts: a subject and a predicate. The subject is what we talk about, and the predicate is what we say about the subject. Example: The horse (subject) runs very fast (predicate). Read More…

Sentences With Compound Predicate

We know that a sentence is made up of two main parts: a subject and a predicate. The subject of a sentence is what we talk about and the predicate is what we say about the subject. For example: The fowl (subject) flew over the fence (predicate). Read More…

The Simple Sentence

We know that a sentence is a group of words that express a complete thought. Example:

The stars are out tonight.

We know that a sentence is divided into two main parts: a subject and a predicate. Example:

The stars (subject) are out tonight (predicate). Read More…

The Compound Sentence

A simple sentence is a sentence which contains just one subject and one predicate. The subject of a simple sentence may be compound (two or more nouns) or simple (just one noun). The predicate of a simple sentence may also be compound (two or more verbs) or simple (just one verb). So what is a compound sentence? Read More…

The Colon

The colon is a punctuation mark or punctuation device which helps writers to better express themselves. The colon is placed at the end of the first part of a sentence to indicate that what is coming next will “prove” or “support” what was said in the past. Read More…

Run-On Sentences

If you’ve ever heard the expression “run-on sentence” before, you probably wondered what that means. A run-on sentence is a type of sentence error. Run-on sentences need to be divided either into two or more separate sentences, or two parts of a compound sentence. Read More…

Proper And Common Nouns

A noun is a word that names a person, place, thing or idea. Because there are so many nouns in the English language, there are many kinds of nouns. In this lesson, we will look at two types of nouns: the proper and the common noun. Read More…

The Compound Noun

A noun is the name of a place, person, thing or idea, examples: fish, tooth, brush, hand, bag, fairy.

Each example given above is a noun made up of just one word. On the other hand, a compound noun is a noun which is made up of two or more words.  Read More…

The Possessive Noun

A noun becomes a possessive noun when it is used in a certain way in a sentence. Look at the sentence below.

The boy is very playful.

The sentence above has just one noun: boy.

The sentence above doesn’t indicate that the boy owns anything.

Let’s change the sentence a little bit. Read More…

Singular and Plural Nouns

A noun is the name of a person, place, thing or idea. Because of the high volume of words which fall under the part of speech of “noun” in the English language, many kinds of nouns exist.

In this article we will look at singular and plural nouns. The word singular means “one” and plural means “more than one”. Most obviously, a singular noun is a noun that names one person, place, thing or idea, and a plural noun is a word which names more than one person, place, thing or idea. Read More…

English Literature – An Introduction by Patrick Carpen

Whereas English Language deals with the mechanics and rules of writing and speaking the English Language, English Literature deals with the fun side of English: poetry, plays, dramas, short stories, novels and other forms of literature.

Here you will dive headfirst into an ocean of literary devices and the fascinating world of figurative speech. You will chase dragons and rescue princesses in an imaginary world. And each time, you will return with a breathtaking experience that leaves memories of sunshine even in times of rain. Read More…

…English Literature – Dear John: A Book Review by Patrick Carpen

Vocabulary Builder by Patrick Carpen

Have fun learning new words and building your vocabulary.Patrick Carpen takes you by the hand and teaches you to most accurately express any thought imaginable.

The English language is rich and diverse and complimented with thousands of words borrowed from other languages. The extensive reach of English words makes it possible to express just about any thought imaginable. Sadly, many people stumble for words when trying to express themselves because they do not have an adequate vocabulary. Read More…

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

Lesson 8

Lesson 9

Lesson 10

Lesson 11

Lesson 12

Lesson 13

Lesson 14

Lesson 15

Lesson 16

Lesson 17

Lesson 18

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